COMBAT Logo
Loading
 
CRIME HOTLINE GET HELP NOW!
           
  COMBAT
Jackson Co. Courthouse
415 E. 12th St., 9th Floor
Kansas City, MO 64106
(816) 881-1400
FAX: (816) 881-1416

email 
CRIME HOTLINE


GET HELP NOW
Call
816-361-5900 if you or someone you know needs treatment.

QUICK LINKS
Prevention Agencies
Treatment Agencies
Jackson County
Drug Task Force

Centers For Disease
Control & Prevention

Contact COMBAT
COMBAT Drug Prevention
& Resource Center

COMBAT Funding

COMBAT Staff
COMBAT History
County Corrections

County Executive
County Legislature
County Prosecutor
County Sheriff

Drug Court

Grant-Match
Funded Agencies

jacksongov.org

Jackson County
Drug Commission

The Monitoring The
Future Survey

National Drug
Intelligence Center

National Institute
On Drug Abuse

Parents The Anti-Drug

Substance Abuse &
Mental Health Services
Administration


White House Office
of National Drug
Control Policy

     
Prescription Drug Abuse & Your Kids
 

For more information visit drugfree.org/
 

Pill BottleMore and more teens are turning away from street drugs, but there's an increasing threat that can be found in your family medicine cabinet.

Many teens -- and even younger children -- believe that prescription (Rx) and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are the "acceptable" alternative to using illicit drugs. To often a kid will do the math 1) a doctor prescribes an Rx drug or recommends an OTC drug + 2) a pharmacist provides them legally + 3) my mom and dad both use them = it's safe to use these.

Parents and other caregivers are the first line of defense in reversing the troubling trend of increased Rx and OTC drug abuse among kids. They have to emphasize how abusing these drugs can add up to an addiction with potentially deadly consequences. 

 

WHAT'S THE PROBLEM?

Teens are abusing some prescription and over-the-counter drugs to get high, including painkillers, such as those drugs prescribed after surgery; depressants, such as sleeping pills or anti-anxiety drugs; and stimulants, such as those drugs prescribed for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Teens are also abusing over-the-counter drugs, such as cough and cold remedies.

Teen Rx AbuseEvery day 2,500 youth age 12 to 17 abuse a pain reliever for the very first time. More teens abuse prescription drugs than any illicit drug, except marijuana. In 2008, more than 2.1 million teens ages 12 to 17 reported abusing prescription drugs. Among 12- and 13-year-olds, prescription drugs are the drug of choice.

Because these drugs are so readily available, and many teens believe they are a safe way to get high, teens who wouldn't otherwise touch illicit drugs might abuse prescription drugs. And not many parents are talking to them about it, even though teens report that parental disapproval is a powerful way to keep them away from drugs.

WHAT ARE THE DANGERS?

There are serious health risks related to abusing prescription drugs.

A single large dose of prescription or over-the-counter painkillers or depressants can cause breathing difficulty that can lead to death.

Stimulant abuse can lead to hostility or paranoia, or the potential for heart system failure or fatal seizures.

Even in small doses, depressants and painkillers have subtle effects on motor skills, judgment, and ability to learn.

The abuse of OTC cough and cold remedies can cause blurred vision, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, coma and even death.

Teen taking pillsMany teens report mixing prescription drugs, OTC drugs, and alcohol. Using these drugs in combination can cause respiratory failure and death.

Prescription and OTC drug abuse is addictive. The number of people seeking treatment for prescription painkiller addiction increased more than 400% between 1997 and 2007, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.


 MORE INFORMATION
Over-The-Counter Drug Abuse
- Short-term effects
- Long-term effects

Signs Of Prescription Drug Abuse

Using Prescription Drugs Responsibly
How To Dispose Of Prescription Drugs

Anabolic Steroids
- Health effects
- Why steroids are dangerous

PREVENTING Rx DRUG ABUSE

Think about your home. What prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs do you have? Where are they kept? Would you know if some were missing? The good news is that you can take steps immediately to limit access to these drugs and help keep your teen drug-free:

Safeguard all drugs at home. Monitor quantities and control access. Take note of how many pills are in a bottle or pill packet, and keep track of refills. This goes for your own medication, as well as for your teen and other members of your household. If you find you have to refill medication more often than expected, there could be a real problem—someone may be taking your medication without your knowledge. If your teen has been prescribed a drug, be sure you control the medication, and monitor dosages and refills.

Set clear rules for teens about all drug use, including not sharing medicine and always following the medical provider's advice and dosages. Make sure your teen uses prescription drugs only as directed by a medical provider and follows instructions for OTC products carefully. This includes taking the proper dosage and not using with other substances without a medical provider's approval. Teens should never take prescription or OTC drugs with street drugs or alcohol. If you have any questions about how to take a drug, call your family physician or pharmacist.

Be a good role model by following these same rules with your own medicines. Examine your own behavior to ensure you set a good example. If you misuse your prescription drugs, such as share them with your kids, or abuse them, your teen will take notice. Avoid sharing your drugs and always follow your medical provider's instructions.

Properly conceal and dispose of old or unneeded medicines in the trash. Unneeded prescription drugs should be hidden and thrown away in the trash. So that teens or others don't take them out of the trash, you can mix them with an undesirable substance (like used coffee grounds or kitty litter) and put the mixture in an empty can or bag. Unless the directions say otherwise, do NOT flush medications down the drain or toilet because the chemicals can pollute the water supply.

Ask friends and family to safeguard their prescription drugs as well. Make sure your friends and relatives, especially grandparents, know about the risks, too, and encourage them to regularly monitor their own medicine cabinets. If there are other households your teen has access to, talk to those families as well about the importance of safeguarding medications. If you don't know the parents of your child's friends, then make an effort to get to know them, and get on the same page about rules and expectations for use of all drugs, including alcohol and illicit drugs. Follow up with your teen's school administration to find out what they are doing to address issues of prescription and over-the-counter drug abuse in schools.

Talk to your teen about the dangers of abusing prescription and over-the-counter drugs. These are powerful drugs that, when abused, can be just as dangerous as street drugs. Tell your teen the risks far outweigh any "benefits."

 

 

 
           
red_spacer

Privacy Policy | Site Map | Contact Us | © 2008 Jackson County, Missouri

Translate this page: