Native Hooved Animal Enclosure
Location: Fleming Park

This 110-acre fenced enclosure, located in Fleming Park on East Park Road, is home to Bison, Elk and White Tailed Deer. Stare a buffalo in the eyes and thrill to a family of elk playing in the pasture. Bring apples or pears to feed the animals as they approach the fences. Open year round, sunrise to sunset. 
 

 NOTICE TO VISITORS: DUE TO CONSTRUCTION, LIGGETT ROAD IS TEMPORARILY CLOSED. PLEASE USE AN ALTERNATE ROUTE TO NATIVE HOOVED ANIMAL ENCLOSURE:

From I-70 & 7 Highway in Blue Springs: Go South 6 miles on 7 Highway; turn right on Colbern Road (West), go approx 1-½ miles and turn right (North) onto Cyclone School Road. Turn right when road forks at Lochkirk Drive. Turn right onto Cowherd Road, then turn left onto Jasper Bell Road. Go north to entrance of Kemper Outdoor Education Center (on left).

From I-70 and I-470 (291 Highway) in Independence:

Go South on I-470 to Colbern Road, exit and turn left (East); go east 3 miles on Colbern Road, turn left (North) on Cyclone School Road. Turn right when road forks at Lochkirk Drive. Turn right onto Cowherd Road, then turn left onto Jasper Bell Road. Go north to entrance of Kemper Outdoor Education Center (on left).

From 291 Highway & Colbern Road in Lees Summit: Go East 3 miles on Colbern Road, turn left (North) on Cyclone School Road. Turn right when road forks at Lochkirk Drive. Turn right onto Cowherd Road, then turn left onto Jasper Bell Road. Go north to entrance of Kemper Outdoor Education Center (on left).

 Liggett Rd Detour Map

(Click here to download a printable detour map)

 


Attention Jackson County Students: Join our “Name The Elk” Contest!

 
Jackson County Parks & Recreation is asking for help from all Jackson County elementary students. We need you to come up with a name for our 4-year-old bull elk, currently known only by the number “M230.” “M230” lives with the rest of our North American elk herd and the bison herd at the Native Hooved Animal Enclosure in Fleming Park, located on the east side of Lake Jacomo. He is one of only two male, or bull elk, in the herd. The other bull elk’s name is “Little Hat.” “M230” needs a better name!

 Help the Elk!

 Download entry in PDF format here!

  

So now through October 31st, any elementary student living in Jackson County can fill out our contest form and mail it in to the address below. Jackson County Parks & Recreation staff will notify the lucky winner, who will win a field trip tour of the Native Hooved Animal Enclosure for his or her entire class and get to meet the newly named elk in person.

Contest Rules: All entries must be mailed in by October 31, 2007 to:

Natural Resources
Jackson County Parks & Recreation 22807 Woods Chapel Road Blue Springs, MO 64015


Contest is open to all elementary school students in Jackson County, Missouri. Form must be completed to be eligible. Upon selection of the winning entry, winner will be contacted by Jackson County Parks & Recreation staff to schedule field trip, which must be accompanied by an educator and/or parents. Winner will also have their entry published on the Jackson County website. For more information, call 816-554-1652 or email lorerud@jacksongov.org

Elk Fun Facts:

    The elk is the second largest species of deer in the world, and one of the largest mammals in North America. In the deer family, only the moose is larger. Elk feed on grasses, plants, leaves and bark. Males are called bulls, females are called cows, and their children are called calves. Only the males have antlers, which start growing in the spring and are shed each winter. Antlers are made of bone which can grow at a rate of 1 inch per day. 
    Bulls can make loud noises known as bugling (download linked mp3 here!) that can be heard for miles. Females are attracted to the males that bugle more often and have the loudest call. During the fall, elk grow a thicker coat of hair to keep them warm during the winter. By summer they shed this heavy coat. Calves are born spotted and they lose their spots by the end of summer. Elk live 20 years or more in captivity but average 10 to 13 years in the wild.